COVID-19(CoronaVirus Disease Pandemic)

  1. What is the recovery time from coronavirus disease?

Using available preliminary data, the mean time from baseline to clinical recovery for mild cases is approximately 2 weeks and 3 to 6 weeks for patients with severe or critical illness.

2. What is the meaning of COVID-19?

COVID-19 is a disease caused by a new strain of coronavirus. ‘CO’ means crown, ‘VI’ for virus and ‘D’ for disease. Previously, this disease was called ‘2019 novel coronavirus’ or ‘2019-nCoV’.

  1. Can I exercise outdoors during the coronavirus pandemic?

Do not exercise if you have a fever, cough, and shortness of breath. Stay home and rest, seek medical attention, and call ahead. Follow the instructions of your local health authority.

If you can walk or bike, always practice physical distance and wash your hands with soap and water before you leave, when you get where you are going, and as soon as you get home. If soap and water are not immediately available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.

4. How long does the coronavirus remain on surfaces?

There is currently no data available on the stability of 2019-nCoV on surfaces. Data from laboratory studies on SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV have shown that stability in the environment depends on several factors, such as relative temperature, humidity and surface type. WHO continues to monitor existing evidence around nCoV and will update when such evidence becomes available.

  1. Who is most at risk of contracting coronavirus disease?

The new coronavirus can infect people of all ages (2019-nCoV). Older people and people with pre-existing medical conditions (such as asthma, diabetes, heart disease) appear to be more vulnerable to becoming seriously ill with the virus.

The WHO advises people of all ages to take steps to protect themselves from the virus, for example by following good hand hygiene and good respiratory hygiene.

  1. Is the coronavirus a bacteria or virus?

The new coronavirus is a respiratory virus that spreads mainly through droplets generated when an infected person coughs or sneezes, or through droplets of saliva or discharge from the nose. To protect yourself, clean your hands frequently with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer or wash with soap and water.

  1. What are the first symptoms of coronavirus disease?

The virus can cause a variety of symptoms, ranging from mild illness to pneumonia. Symptoms of the disease are fever, cough, sore throat, and headaches. In severe cases, breathing difficulties and deaths can occur.

  1. Is headache a symptom of coronavirus disease?

The virus can cause a variety of symptoms, from mild illness to pneumonia. Symptoms of the disease are fever, cough, sore throat, and headaches.

9. Are the masks effective against coronavirus disease?

If you are healthy, you only need to wear a mask if you are caring for a person with suspected 2019-nCoV infection. Wear a mask if you are coughing or sneezing. Masks are effective only when used in combination with frequent hand cleaning with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer or soap and water. If you wear a mask, then you need to know how to wear it and dispose of it properly.

  1. Can coronavirus disease be spread through food?

Current evidence on other coronavirus strains shows that while coronaviruses appear to be stable at low temperatures and freezing for a certain period, food hygiene and good food safety practices can prevent their transmission through food.

  1. Can antibiotics treat coronavirus disease?

No, antibiotics don’t work against viruses. 2019-nCOV is a virus, and therefore antibiotics should not be used as a means of prevention or treatment.

  1. Is coronavirus disease more serious than flu?

COVID-19 causes more serious illness than seasonal flu.

While many people around the world have developed immunity to seasonal influenza strains, COVID-19 is a new virus against which no one has immunity. That means more people are susceptible to infection, and some will suffer serious illness.

Globally, approximately 3.4% of reported cases of COVID-19 have died. In comparison, seasonal flu generally kills far less than 1% of those infected.

  1. How do viruses get their name?

Viruses are named based on their genetic makeup to facilitate the development of diagnostic tests, vaccines, and medications. Virologists and the scientific community in general do this work, which is why viruses are named by the International Committee on Virus Taxonomy (ICTV).

  1. Can the flu virus be transmitted through the mosquito bite?

To date, there has been no information or evidence to suggest that the new coronavirus may be transmitted by mosquitoes. The new coronavirus is a respiratory virus that spreads mainly through droplets generated when an infected person coughs or sneezes, or through droplets of saliva or discharge from the nose. To protect yourself, clean your hands frequently with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer or wash with soap and water. Also, avoid close contact with anyone who is coughing and sneezing.

 

  1. Can COVID-19 be passed from a woman to her unborn or newborn baby?

We still don’t know if a pregnant woman with COVID-19 can transmit the virus to her fetus or baby during pregnancy or delivery. To date, the virus has not been found in samples of amniotic fluid or breast milk.

  1. What happens when I get coronavirus disease?

People with COVID-19 generally develop signs and symptoms, including mild respiratory symptoms and fever, on average 5-6 days after infection (average incubation period 5-6 days, range 1-14 days). Most people infected with the COVID-19 virus have mild illness and recover.

  1. Can I get coronavirus from the stool of someone with the disease?

The risk of contracting COVID-19 from the stool of an infected person appears to be low. While initial research suggests that the virus may be present in feces in some cases, spread via this route is not a major feature of the outbreak. Ongoing research into the ways in which COVID-19 is disseminated and will continue to share new findings. However, because it’s a risk, it’s another reason to wash your hands regularly, after using the bathroom, and before eating.

  1. Should blood centers systematically test blood products for COVID-19 virus?

No, although SARS-CoV-2 RNA fragments were detected in the blood of symptomatic COVID-19 patients, this does not mean that the virus is viable / infectious. In general, respiratory viruses are not known to be transmitted by blood transfusion. Blood centers should have routine blood donor screening measures to prevent people with respiratory symptoms or fever from donating blood. As precautionary measures, blood centers may encourage self-deferral of those with a history of travel to a COVID-19 affected country in the previous 14 days, or of those who have been diagnosed with COVID-19 or are in contact close with a confirmed COVID-19. case.

19. Should people with mild symptoms be hospitalized?

No. For patients with mild illnesses, for example, mild fever, cough, malaise, runny nose, sore throat without warning signs, such as shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, increased airways (i.e. sputum or hemoptysis) Gastro-intestinal symptoms such as nausea, vomiting and / or diarrhea and without changes in mental status, hospitalization may not be necessary unless there is concern about rapid clinical deterioration. All discharged patients should be instructed to return to the hospital if they develop worsening disease.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *